Monday, July 7, 2008

In the South, the Deep South . . .

Last week my husband, brother-in-law and I were driving waaaaaaaaaaayyyyy out in the country. Fortunately we had a camera in tow and, being the very kind husband that he is, mine obliged me by stopping once, to take a few photos to share with all of you myriad readers of mine. (4+1, perhaps? Quite the myriad, no?) We saw LOTS of corn fields on this trip. Tons. Just think of all the ethanol they can make with that stuff. But, that aside, we were hungry and thought of having a couple of steaming hot ears of golden, freshly picked, sweet corn dripping with butter, topped with salt and freshly ground pepper . . . Uuuuuummmmm! (It was very tempting, until I figured it was only field corn, and that's not my idea good eating corn.)

Then, we also saw many fields of soy beans. The picture below is only one of them. Isn't it rich and deep, dark green? It was a really nice looking field.


Then, right next door (more or less) there was this grouping of trees, etc. Care to guess what's lurking there not too far away?
Check out the "bear grass" palmetto plant sort of in the middle at the bottom of the picture below. That's reputed to be murder on those trekking through wooded areas like this one. (It would've been rough going on those early Spanish, etc., explorers of the "New World." And that's not mentioning all the vines of poisonous plants, spiders, snakes, mosquitos, etc. So . . . let your imagination run wild! I'm sure I've not even come close to identifying half of what might lurk just out of camera range . . . or maybe even IN camera range, just undiscovered!
Have you guessed yet, what should be a bit more evident in this picture than the previous one?



No? Well, how about in this next one . . . [I'll take Bush Babe's (of Granite Glen) tack and leave it open to your wit and wisdom, even though her pictures are professional and mine very amateurish.] If interested, I'll print one of these and mail them to the first one who acurately guesses what these last three pictures are recording. I'm sure you'll figure it out.

I thought this area was very beautiful and was glad I got to take a few pictures!

7 comments:

debby said...

Last picture looks like bunyips could pop out of the water!

Ward & Brianne said...

those landscape pictures are very beautiful! :)

Pencil Writer said...

Debby, is that your FINAL ANSWER? But, you know, I thought the same thing when I looked at those pictures. Bunyips! Eeegads! I didn't know we had bunyips in this part of the world! But, bun-yips just by NAME don't sound so scary, do they? Really?

Ward & Brianne: thanks for dropping by and for the compliments. (Looks like you may have come my way by my neice, Corrie?) Drop by any time!

uncleorchid said...

those are some hot looking pneumatophores...

Kristofer & Corrine said...

I think these pictures are GREAT!! So peaceful! love them!! :)

Bush Babe (of Granite Glen) said...

Gorgeous PW! Thanks for the compliment - and I have no idea what I am guessing about! Bunyips or swamp monsters did come to mind... eeeuwwww! But the vines and colours are gorgeous...

Hugs
BB

Pencil Writer said...

uncle orchid--I had to look up pneumatophores! I knew "bald cypress" -- obviously since there are so many in this part of the woods! Jus' din't know the scientific name fer 'em! Thanks for elucidating. That wasn't the answer I was looking for, however.

debby and BB: If you click on the picture (last in the cue) you MIGHT see the critter I didn't expect to find until AFTER I looked at the photo--blown up version. I expected a different one, somehow. Seriously considered the possibilities of bunyips. (I still giggle thinking a BUNYIP could actually be a scary monster!) It must be the telling of the tale that makes it scary! The name certainly doesn't inspire fear in MY heart!